What to Expect from Working with a Holistic Nurse

Holistic nurses see and assess clients as whole persons, incorporating their body, mind, emotion, spirit and environment. They are found in all arenas of health care, from Emergency Departments to Intensive Care, to Outpatient surgery and clinics and in private practices. You can ask for a holistic nurse in any practice setting.

"The words 'Holistic Nursing' mean nursing the whole person in the ways of Nightingale… fresh air, fresh food and water, spiritual sustenance, and mental and emotional support leading to clarity for the one being cared for." -- AHNA member Julie Nelson RN, HN-BC

How Are Holistic Nurses Different?

Compared with nurses who have not specialized in holistic health and healing, holistic nurses are likely to:

  • Be more calm and centered

  • Listen to you more closely

  • Ask more questions related to all aspects of your life, including your body, mind, emotion, spirit and environment

  • Have a non-judgmental attitude toward your issues and concerns

  • May blend conventional medical practice with complementary healing practices, such as nutrition, massage, energy work, aromatherapy and others


Practitioner
Directory

Find a holistic nurse
near you!



Holistic 

Modalities

Why Choose
Holism?

Know a Nurse?
Give the gift of AHNA
membership



ANA Specialty
Recognition


FAQs

Self Care

Holistic Nurse Education and Certification

There are Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) who work under the supervision of a Registered Nurse and there are Registered Nurses (RNs) who may have and Associate, Bachelors, Masters or Doctoral degree. Nurses at any of these levels of education may also have studied holism, holistic health and complementary, alternative or integrative healing modalities.

Since 2007, holistic nursing has been recognized by the American Nurses Association (ANA) as a specialty practice. ANA represents the interests of the nation’s 3.1 million RNs through a formal process for recognizing specialty areas of nursing practice. This process includes specific criteria for approving the specialty, the scope statement and an acknowledgment by ANA of the standards of practice for that specialty. Learn more at www.nursingworld.org.

Holistic nurses can also choose to become board-certified. The American Holistic Nurses Credentialing Corporation (AHNCC) is responsible for certifying nurses who base their practice in the precepts of holistic nursing and have met specific qualifications and competencies in the specialty practice of holistic nursing. AHNCC-certified Holistic Nurses and Nurse Coaches promote health, wellness and wellbeing as they facilitate their client’s personal growth and healing. Certification is a voluntary process and should not be confused with a legal professional license. 

There are six credentials that can be obtained through testing by the American Holistic Nurses Certification Corporation (AHNCC):

·       Holistic Nurse-Board Certified (HN-BC) for nurses who are graduates of any nationally accredited nursing program

·       Holistic Nurse Baccalaureate-Board Certified (HNB-BC) for nurses who are graduates of a nationally accredited Baccalaureate level nursing program

·       Advanced Holistic Nurse-Board Certified (AHN-BC) for nurses who are graduates of a nationally accredited Graduate Nursing program

·       Advanced Practice Holistic Nurse-Board Certified (APHN-BC) for nurses who are graduates of a nationally accredited Graduate Nursing program and who have a current unrestricted U.S. APRN license. Advanced Practice Holistic Nurses can prescribe conventional medicines and also offer and/or discuss complementary and integrative approaches that are outside of conventional medical practice.

·       Nurse Coach-Board Certified (NC-BC) for nurses who have graduated from a minimum of a Baccalaureate (BS, BA, BSN) degree in Nursing from an accredited academic institution and have completed at least 60 hours of coaching experience that has been mentored and/or supervised by a Certified Nurse Coach Supervisor

·       Health and Wellness Nurse Coach-Board Certified (HWNC-BC) for nurses who have graduated from a minimum of a Baccalaureate (BS, BA, BSN) degree in Nursing from an accredited academic institution and have completed at least 60 hours of coaching experience that has been mentored and/or supervised by a Certified Nurse Coach Supervisor and have any of the other holistic nursing certifications

These certifications offer nurses a way to distinguish themselves as experts in nursing practice, education and research. They are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Specialty Nursing Certification [ABSNC] and recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center [ANCC] Magnet Program.

Tips for Choosing a Holistic Nurse or Nurse Practitioner

·       Many nurses use the holistic health philosophy in their practice, but only a small portion of those are board certified in holistic nursing

·       A brief interview visit is a good place to start with any healthcare provider before you begin active work on your issues. At that initial interview you can find out what the person has to offer, what their credentials are and how you the client feel about your interaction with them.

·      Be clear about what you want out of the visit, and share this with your nurse or nurse practitioner

"The words 'Holistic Nursing' mean  nursing the whole person in the ways of Nightingale….fresh air, fresh food and water, spiritual sustenance and mental and emotional support leading to clarity for the one being cared for." -- AHNA member Julie Nelson RN, HN-BC

 


 
 


Copyright 2016 by American Holistic Nurses Association    Terms of Use   Privacy Statement